“Woo-Hoo! They’re Number #1! They’re Number #1!” – Happy 30th Anniversary, The Simpsons

Top Ten Best Simpsons Episodes 

10.

9.

8.

7. Barthood (Season 27, Episode 9): …

Although I comment some new Simpsons episodes as, “Meh”, I actually loved Barthood. By watching this episode, you’ll be denying, but secretly feeling sympathy for BartSince watching the show, I’ve never known a background (growing up) story for Bart or Maggie. However, this is one of the best future episodes I’ve seen. I liked how Bart has different connections to his family – from how he’s overshadowed by Lisa and to his close connection with Abe Simpson.

Bart’s live in Barthood can also be relate to any kid and adult, who has gone through isolation in their lives. If this was a classic episode from the 90’s, then, I would re-watch it all over again. But, I will and would recommend Barthood to anyone who is a fan of The Simpsons.

6.

5. I Married Marge (Season 3, Episode 12): …

I Married Marge is a heart-warming episode, which shows that true love can conquer all, despite having to live with no money as a young, unmarried couple. Can a married couple survive on low benefits, unexpected pregnancies and family differences? Well, this episode provided me that. Even as a child, it taught me that it takes someone (who will love as you are) to stay with you forever. This is an excellent example, truly showing why Homer and Marge are the iconic and inspirational couple in the modern world.

4. The Girl Who Slept Too Little (Season 17, Episode 2): …

Like I Married Marge, The Girl Who Slept Too Little is a touching episode and it tackles fears very well. Although many new audiences or old audiences before Season 16 won’t consider a “classic Simpsons episode”, there is something about The Girl Who Slept Too Little that drew in me into it. It certainly isn’t the jokes, nor is it the animation; it is the meaning behind this episode that touched my heart (and I couldn’t help myself by smiling, as well). This is a great episode for anyone who is into old TV shows before the 2010’s.

3. The Book Job (Season 23, Episode 6): …

The Book Job has to be a firm favourite in the series – and not just for my love of books. It depicts a clear understanding of how some novels are used, via market research and non-existing authors to receive profit, how society is losing out for true, individual talent in modern literature and what it truly takes to create something that doesn’t cost a fortune. The storyline was well researched too; according to Wikipedia, the idea for this episode came when Matt Selman (the Executive Producer) read a magazine article about Alloy Entertainment and the company’s use for ghost-writers’. Also, I love the fandom tributes that the creators used in this episode – Ocean’s Eleven and Harry Potter, what more could you want? Basically, I just everything about it and that’s why I put The Book Job at number three.

2. Large Marge (Season 14, Episode 4): …

Large Marge is a clever and creative episode; as long as I can remember, this is the only episode that tackles issues with plastic surgery. Large Marge is also one of a few classic episodes where it has a moral at the ending – you are beautiful, just the way you are. I highly praise Ian Maxtone-Graham’s creativity, writing an interesting script focusing on situations where women want to improve their beauty so they can be attracted to men. It’s a fantastic episode to watch and you will learn something from it; a good episode to start with if you are new to The Simpsons.

1.   Simple Simpson (Season 15, Episode 19): …

This episode has the most funny, touching and charming storyline I have ever seen. I really love the relationship between Homer and Lisa, which was the main focus of the episode. Many of the father and daughter moments in The Simpsons are special, but this one takes the crown because of all the promises and love they gave to each other. Also, I love the spoof of Homer and Marge’s upside kiss, inspired from the 2002 film Spiderman; for me, that kiss just makes my heart flatter. Can’t go wrong with a tender kiss. 😀

Apart from that, that’s all I have to say about Simple Simpson.

 

Films I Wish To Act In

Since I can remember, I always adored the movies and theatre. It’s properly one of the main reasons why I wanted to try and choose acting as an career (as well as being a writer). Since I’ve been and currently performing on stage, I’ve always wanted to try out for new things. I’m not afraid of performing and as an individual, I want to push myself and say, “Gigi, you’ve done yourself proud, for you have achieved this task today!” So if I had any opportunity to perform whilst I’m studying at Drama school and afterwards, I would been very keen to be in shows or films:

  • St Trianians 3

I loved the St Trianians Films when I was teen and I still love them now. In my mind, I always wanted to be a Posh Totty. I’ve no idea why, but I just the idea of this group; to me, it spells F-U-N!

  • James Bond

I’ve loved the Bond movies too. If I had a opportunity, I would try for a villain role. Again, it sounds F-U-N, like your going on a roller coaster ride.

  • Tarzan

No words to say on this one, just looking for adventure…

  • We Will Rock You

W.W.R.Y is one of my favourite musicals of all time and I feel it’ll be nice to be apart of something that celebrates the iconic music from one of the famous British bands of all time.

  • Wicked

This is my second favourite musical… PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE….
I’m not sure if they’ll ever happen in my lifetime but I can only keep believing, as I know the right ones will come along. 

What’s your ideal dream movie/show you want to be in? I would love to hear in the comments below. 

I know I’m not very talkative today and I do apologise, but I promise I’ll write another, proper blog as soon as I can. Until then…

Best wishes,
Gigi xx

It All Started With A Small Tank Engine – Happy 70th Anniversary, Thomas and Friends

“There was no doubt in my mind that steam engines all had definite personalities. I would hear them snorting up the grade and little imagination was needed to hear in the puffings and pantings of the two engines the conversation they were having with one another: ‘I can’t do it! I can’t do it! I can’t do it!’ ‘Yes, you can! Yes, you can! Yes, you can!'”

Those were the words of the late Reverend Wilbert Awdry, whose memory of hearing trains, travelling past his house in the night (while listening in his bed) later became the inspiration for Edward and Gordon, one of the first stories in the Railway Series books. Now, seventy years later, it’s hard to imagine children not seeing their favourite number one tank engine. But today, Thomas and Friends haven’t just won the hearts of children.

It seems that Thomas’ fans are children and adults on the autism spectrum. So why is Thomas so popular? For so many, Thomas the Tank Engine and his friends play an important role for helping their social and creative skills, such as human emotions, imagination and communication. Through these experiences, both children and adults begin to have strong relationships with Thomas, when they have a few or no friends of their own. Thomas can also give comfort, and make children and vulnerable adults safe in their world, when they are frightened and/or upset. Because of this, Thomas’ relationships with the children and adults last longer than their siblings.

As a child with autism, I used to love Thomas; I would watch my old videos of every early episodes (between 1984 and 2000) and Thomas and the Magic Railroad. Watching them made me feel safe and secure whenever I had a bad day. I loved Thomas, as much I loved watching my other favourite children’s shows including Fireman Sam and Postman Pat. Like so many children with autism, I was fascinated with the scenery, background, colours, the stories, storylines and the imaginative play. Looking back on certain episodes as an adult, nothing has changed. I guess I can say I’m young at heart.

I wonder what Awdry will think of Thomas and the small blue engine changed the world? All it took was pure imagination, and amazing creativity to make Thomas and his friends a reality. It’s hard to believe that seven generations of children and adult alike still remember Thomas the Tank Engine. Along with eighteen series’, two hundred and forty-one episodes and eleven films, I can see that Thomas and his friends will continue to live on forever and possibility the next seventy years.

And with that, I leave you with this final sentence:

Thank you, Thomas

For making our childhood,

And for being there when we needed you.

So, Happy Birthday Thomas

And many happy returns to you,

On the year of your seventy birthday.